Eureka Mechanical Plastic Sheet

Many clients throughout the Eureka area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

Lamcorr FM 4910

Eureka Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

We use many products with little to no regard as to how they came to be. One such product is called polystyrene. This is a type of polymer plastic that is used in manufacturing, construction, and for household items that we use everyday. Polystyrene sheets can be molded to specific shapes and sizes and are used in a variety of ways. It can be made into all different types of colors, but is most commonly found to be white or clear.

In manufacturing and construction, polystyrene sheets are used as a packing material. Think of the box your fragile electronics come in. There is usually that hard foam surrounding your purchase, protecting it from bumps and drops, right? This is an insulator formed from expanded polystyrene sheets. In construction, polystyrene sheets are used as molds for concrete or other building materials. They are also used as a form of insulation.

When thinking of it's household uses, you can bet that polystyrene sheets are used in ways that you would never believe! Those little Styrofoam cups we drink from are made from that product. The yogurt you may have eaten for lunch was put into a cup made from it too! Polystyrene is used to make CD and DVD cases, molded to form the handles for disposable razors, and used in many toys that your children may have. It is also a popular product used in many craft materials.

So, why is this stuff so great? For a lot of reasons!

It is lightweight and very easy to work with.
It can be molded into virtually any shape or size, come in large and small sheets or blocks, and can fit easily into a box.
It is a good insulator, protecting objects from water and water vapor, as well as fungus and mildew.
It protects fragile objects from drops, bumps and scratches that may otherwise cause damage.
Polystyrene sheets are available for purchase in many home improvement stores for personal use. You can cut them to the size you need quite easily, or they may be able to cut them at the store, just ask the salesperson if they offer the service. For large quantities used for more commercial purposes, companies on the Internet will be able to fill your order to your exact specifications.

Extruded Nylon

Polystyrene Sheets: It Has Many Uses

If you're shopping around for plastic tableware, you've no doubt seen that plastic glasses and dishes come in a vast array of styles, types and even qualities these days. Since each promises a different set of features and benefits, choosing the right plastic tableware may seem a daunting task. But don't despair! Here are a few tips to help you decide which type of plastic best meets your needs, and how to know exactly what you're buying.

Tip 1 - Don't just shop for "plastic," because not all plastics are created equal:

So true! Ever had indestructible plastic glasses that last from year to year, while others break the first time they're dropped? How about plastic dishes that scratch like crazy after a few uses? What about plastic plates that overheat after just seconds in the microwave -- or glasses that clouded in the dishwasher?

Though frustrating, these common issues aren't really defects in the plastic, they're just differences. More than a half-dozen types of plastic are used to make tableware - from unbreakable Tritan and budget-friendly SAN, to scratch-resistant Melamine and decorative Acrylic. Each offers its own benefits and drawbacks.

Knowing how different plastics perform and how to tell them apart when shopping can ensure that the plastic dishes, glasses and serving pieces you choose best meet your needs. Tips two and three will help you do just that.

Tip 2 - Decide on the features that matter to you before shopping:

Shopping for plastic tableware would be a cinch if a single plastic offered it all -unbreakable, scratchproof, dishwasher and microwave-safe. Unfortunately, that plastic is not yet invented. So of the plastics that do exist, which option is right for you?

Do unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products top your list? If so, spending a little more on unbreakable Tritan or Polycarbonate plastic items is well worth the years of use you'll enjoy. For a little less, SAN plastic products are almost as durable, and casual looks in Polypropylene are equally durable and very inexpensive. Avoid anything in Acrylic or Polystyrene.

Are scratched dishes your pet peeve? Then Melamine dishes are your best choice for long-term satisfaction. But you'll have to forego the convenience of microwave heating.

Are microwave-safe dishes a must? The selection is slimmer, but there are some choices in plastics made specifically for the microwave. Look for dishes under the brand names Nordic Ware, Miracleware and ExtremeWare - and avoid products made from Melamine, Acrylic and Polystyrene.

Are you drawn to decorative or themed dishes? Trendy designs and seasonal themes are widely available in plastic tableware. Very decorative glasses are generally crafted in Acrylic, but be prepared to hand wash to keep them looking their best. You'll also find plenty of decorative and themed designs in durable easy-care Melamine dinnerware.

Is cost more important than longevity? Inexpensive seasonal Acrylic and Polystyrene tableware is plentiful on store shelves. But with plastics, you do get what you pay for. These low-cost styles won't hold up under impact or in the dishwasher for much more than a season or two.

Tip 3 - Know what you're buying - even if the label doesn't tell you:

You now know that the plastics used to make tableware vary indeed, and which type best meets your needs. So how do you tell if a plastic glass is made of SAN or Acrylic? How do you spot Melamine dishes? And what the heck is Polypropylene, anyway?

If shopping online with a reputable seller, product information will include plastic types, features and care. If it doesn't you may want to shop a different site as the seller may not know, or stand behind, their product. In-store shopping can be a bit trickier because not all plastic products are clearly labeled by type. There you'll need to know a bit more than the label tells you.

Unbreakable products in Tritan and Polycarbonate plastic are easy to identify because they're generally labeled as "Unbreakable" and "Dishwasher-safe" to offset their higher price tag. Tritan items are also labeled "BPA-free." Both plastics are generally found in glass-like clear or tinted drinkware and dishes.

Unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products in Polypropylene plastic are easy to identify, too. They're always opaque or semi-opaque, think Tupperware, and have a rubbery feel unlike any other plastic. These products also tend to be low-priced.

Labeling on Melamine dishes varies, but that's not a problem if you know what to look for. All melamine dishes are opaque - never see-through - and have a rigid feel. Because of melamine's durability and scratch-resistance, it's the most common plastic used to make dishes and can be found in a huge variety of colors and decorative designs. Melamine dishes are dishwasher-safe, but not microwave-safe, so melamine dishes are almost always marked "Not Intended for Microwave Use."

Plastic dishes and cookware made from microwave-safe plastics are always clearly labeled "Microwave-safe" because that's their major selling point. These items are always dishwasher-safe and sometimes oven-safe, too.

Glasses and dishes made from Acrylic, Polystyrene and SAN plastics are rarely labeled by type, but you can tell them apart. Though shatterproof, they're not truly unbreakable, so you won't see that on the label. The major difference is the care. SAN plastic products are dishwasher- and microwave reheat-safe, and usually labeled as such. Polystyrene products are generally labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," while Acrylic products are almost always "Hand Wash."

Tip 4 - Care matters! Enjoy your plastic tableware for years:

As plastics differ so does their care, but you can extend the life and looks of even the least expensive products if you treat them right.

In the dishwasher, a good rule of thumb for any plastic glasses - even those marked "Dishwasher-safe" - is to wash on a normal, unheated cycle. Some dishwashers heat water excessively in certain cycles, so a normal setting is always the best bet.

Items labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe" should be placed in the top rack, away from the heating element at the bottom - with one exception. Some Melamine dishes are labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," but they won't fit in the top rack. These are fine to wash in the bottom rack on an air-dry setting.

Items labeled "Hand Wash" really should be washed by hand. These products will quickly crackle or cloud if exposed to dishwasher heat and detergents.

Abrasive cleaners or scrubbers should not be used on any clear plastic glasses or plates as they will, without exception, scratch. Melamine plates hold up to most scrubber sponges.

Tip 5 - Ignore the #7 recycling symbol - it doesn't identify specific plastics:

Last, save yourself some shopping frustration. Don't rely on recycling numbers - those little numbers in a triangle on some plastic items - to identify plastics. In fact, these numbers don't even appear on many plastic tableware items. Why? It's simple, they're not disposable.

Recycling numbers, officially known as SPI codes, are intended to identify commonly disposed plastics so they can be efficiently recycled - that's all. The #7 code is a catchall number used for the non-recyclable plastics - and that includes many plastics used to make long-lasting tableware.

Contrary to some media stories, the #7 code does not denote an unsafe plastic. Anyone suggesting that all plastic items with the #7 code are unsafe because they contain the chemical BPA simply did not do their homework. Most good-quality plastics, including Melamine, Acrylic, SAN, Tritan and even biodegradable Eco-plastics all fall under the #7 code, and not one of them contains BPA.

Polycarbonate is the only tableware plastic that contains BPA. If media reports on BPA concern you, just avoid polycarbonate products. Products made from Tritan plastic offer the same benefits as polycarbonate, without BPA.

So whatever your tableware needs, from unbreakable plastic glasses for outdoors, to durable dishes for everyday, to decorative styles inspired by the season, there's surely a plastic available that meets your needs. Armed with these tips, you shouldn't have any problem finding it.

Eureka

Aerospace Plastics For Aircraft Plastic Components


California Machine Grade Sheet Plastic

Eureka Best Plastic Rod

Many clients throughout the Eureka area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

Kynar PVDF Sheet

Eureka Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

Plastics cover a broad field of organic synthetic resin and may be divided into two main classifications - aerospace thermoplastics _ and aerospace thermosetting plastics. Thermoplastics may be softened by heat and can be dissolved in various organic solvents.

Aerospace Thermoplastics.

Thermoplastics may be softened by heat and can be dissolved in various organic solvents. Two kinds of transparent thermoplastic materials are commonly employed in windows, canopies, etc. These are known as acrylic plastics and cellulose acetate plastics. Cellulose acetate was used in the past but since it is dimensionally unstable and turns yellow after it has been installed for a time, it has just about passed from the scene and is not considered an acceptable substitute for acrylic. Acrylic plastics are known by the trade names of Lucite or Plexiglas and by the British as Perspex and meet the military specifications of MIL-P-5425 for regular acrylic, MIL-P-8184 -~ 184 for craze-resistant acrylic.

Aerospace Thermosetting Plastics.

Thermosetting plastics do not soften appreciably under heat but may char and blister at temperatures of 240 to 260 'C (400 to 500 °F). Most of the moulded products of synthetic resin composition, such as phenolic, urea-formaldehyde, and melamine formaldehyde resins, belong to the thermosetting group. Once the plastic becomes hard, additional heat will not change it back into a liquid as it would with a thermoplastic.

Storage and handling.

Because transparent thermoplastic sheets soften and deform when they are heated, they must be where the temperature will never be excessive.

Aerospace thermoforming.

Transparent acrylic plastics get soft and pliable when they are heated to their forming temperatures and can be formed to almost any shape. When they cool, they retain the shape to which they were formed. Acrylic plastic may be cold-bent into a single curvature if the material is thin and the bending radius is at least 180 times the thickness of the sheet. Cold bending beyond these limits will impose so much stress on the surface of the plastic that tiny fissures or cracks, called crazing, will form.

Forming methods.

Simple Curve Forming. Heat the plastic material to the recommended temperature, remove it from the heat source, and carefully drape it over the prepared form. Carefully press the hot plastic to the form and either hold or clamp the sheet in place until it cools. This process may take from ten minutes to one-half hour. Do not force-cool it.

Compound-Curve Forming.

This type of forming is normally used for such parts as canopies or complex wingtip light covers, and it requires a great deal of specialized equipment. There are four commonly used methods, each having its advantages and disadvantages.

Stretch forming. Preheated acrylic sheets are stretched mechanically over the form in much the same way as is done with the simple curved piece. Special care must be taken to preserve uniform thickness of the material, since some parts will have to stretch more than others.

Male And Female Die Forming. This requires expensive matching male and female dies. The heated plastic sheet is placed between the dies which are then mated. When the plastic cools, the dies are opened.

Aerospace Vacuum Forming Without Forms. Many aircraft canopies are formed by this method. In this process a clamp with an opening of the desired shape is placed over a vacuum box and the heated sheet of plastic is clamped in place. When the air in the box is evacuated, the outside air pressure will force the hot plastic through the opening and form the concave canopy. It is the surface tension of the plastic that shapes the canopy.

Aerospace Vacuum Forming With A Female Form. If the shape needed is other than that which would be formed by surface tension, a female mould, or form must be used. It is placed below the plastic sheet and the vacuum pump is connected. When air from the form is evacuated, the outside air pressure will force the hot plastic sheet into the mould and fill it.

TECAPEEK MT

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Polycarbonate

Decorative concrete has become a very popular new flooring choice for both residential and commercial construction projects. They are easy to maintain, great for regions with a lot of sand or snow, and a good alternative to carpeting if the homeowner has allergies. Decorative concrete flooring is often installed in a new home early in the construction process, which can result in damage from paint splatters, grime from workboats, impact from falling materials, and wheeled traffic. How do you help safeguard these freshly polished floors from construction traffic and mishaps from dropped tools and building materials?

There are several different types of surface protection that protect newly-installed decorative concrete floors from damage. Many contractors use Masonite, sheet plastic, and slick films to try to protect concrete flooring. These items offer limited protection and have serious limitations. Products like plywood can scratch flooring and are typically heavy and difficult to store after use. Masonite is bulky and can't easily be repositioned on a job site. Occasionally, the masonite 4' x 8' sheets separate and allow wheeled traffic to directly roll over the new floor. Also, Masonite is not absorbent, so liquids flow off the sides and get into spaces between sheets, damaging the decorative concrete. Sheet plastic has its own set of challenges. While it is easier to move around a job site and is less expensive than other floor protection options, it can be very slippery on top of polished concrete flooring and may lead to worker injuries if someone falls or trips. Plastic sheeting moves easily, which means that without being taped down, it could slide on the floor. Lastly, sheet plastic offers no impact protection from dropped heavy items. Another option that contractors use to protect decorative concrete floors that doesn't work well are temporary carpets. The carpets have a rubber backing, which does not allow the concrete to breathe. While it makes for good protection against impacts, it is heavy and awkward to move and does not absorb spills well at all. It is also a very expensive type of protection.

Many builders have tried each of these methods to protect decorative concrete but nothing works perfectly. The ideal product would be breathable so that concrete can cure, absorb spills, prevent differential drying, and would provide impact protection. If possible, the product would be reusable and recyclable to reduce waste. Luckily, there are several surface protection products on the market that meet all of these requirements.

Ram Board™ is a heavy-duty floor protection product that is made of a thick cardboard-like material. One roll of Ram Board™ is the same thickness of ten sheets of Masonite, and since it comes in rolls, it is much easier to transport, move around, and store. It lays fast and flat upon being unrolled and allows moisture to escape for curing floors. Ram Board™ is water-resistant and prevents oils and other materials from seeping through and staining concrete flooring. Ram Board's breathable Vapor Cure™ tape can be used to tape ram board sheets together and does not result in cure lines.

SurfacePro™ is a thick, breathable floor protection product that has a skid-resistant backing. It comes in large rolls and easily cuts to size. SurfacePro™ is reusable and provides 40 mils of protection for decorative concrete floors. The breathable product prevents cure lines in newly-installed concrete and it won't invalidate the flooring manufacturer's warranty. Unlike the paper Ramboard, Surface Pro is reusable and last longer.

SurfaceLiner Vapor™ is a new product that is similar to SurfacePro™, but also has a lightly tacky back that almost acts like an adhesive. It lightly grips floors without leaving any sort of residue. SurfaceLiner Vapor™ is breathable and vapor-transmitting for new concrete floors. It is also waterproof and tear-resistant. SurfaceLiner Vapor™ has padded protection that is very effective against impact damage.

,EZcover by McTech Group is a natural cellulose fiber composite that immediately starts absorbing a spill without degrading. It has a dense top layer and a soft cushion on the bottom and is designed to take impacts. EZcover breathes well, is relatively easy to cut/shape around objects, and comes in large rolls for easy placement over large areas. If kept in decent condition, EZcover is reusable. It is its durable against construction traffic and wheeled traffic and the edges can be taped if needed.

While contractors can use basic products such as sheet plastic, Masonite, and carpeting to protect decorative concrete floors, the most effective types of protection are specialized floor protection products. Products such as Ram Board™, Surface Pro™, SurfaceLiner Vapor™, and EZcover are specifically designed to provide the very best protection at a competitive price. Remember; protection is an investment and prevents the high costs of replacement or repair that may happen if the expensive flooring is not protected. Contact your local surface protection supplier for more information how to best protect your valuable concrete floors.

Eureka

Plastics In Natural Disasters


Nevada Engineering Plastic Sheet

Eureka Hydex 4101

Many clients throughout the Eureka area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

Lamcorr FM 4910

Eureka Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

If you're shopping around for plastic tableware, you've no doubt seen that plastic glasses and dishes come in a vast array of styles, types and even qualities these days. Since each promises a different set of features and benefits, choosing the right plastic tableware may seem a daunting task. But don't despair! Here are a few tips to help you decide which type of plastic best meets your needs, and how to know exactly what you're buying.

Tip 1 - Don't just shop for "plastic," because not all plastics are created equal:

So true! Ever had indestructible plastic glasses that last from year to year, while others break the first time they're dropped? How about plastic dishes that scratch like crazy after a few uses? What about plastic plates that overheat after just seconds in the microwave -- or glasses that clouded in the dishwasher?

Though frustrating, these common issues aren't really defects in the plastic, they're just differences. More than a half-dozen types of plastic are used to make tableware - from unbreakable Tritan and budget-friendly SAN, to scratch-resistant Melamine and decorative Acrylic. Each offers its own benefits and drawbacks.

Knowing how different plastics perform and how to tell them apart when shopping can ensure that the plastic dishes, glasses and serving pieces you choose best meet your needs. Tips two and three will help you do just that.

Tip 2 - Decide on the features that matter to you before shopping:

Shopping for plastic tableware would be a cinch if a single plastic offered it all -unbreakable, scratchproof, dishwasher and microwave-safe. Unfortunately, that plastic is not yet invented. So of the plastics that do exist, which option is right for you?

Do unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products top your list? If so, spending a little more on unbreakable Tritan or Polycarbonate plastic items is well worth the years of use you'll enjoy. For a little less, SAN plastic products are almost as durable, and casual looks in Polypropylene are equally durable and very inexpensive. Avoid anything in Acrylic or Polystyrene.

Are scratched dishes your pet peeve? Then Melamine dishes are your best choice for long-term satisfaction. But you'll have to forego the convenience of microwave heating.

Are microwave-safe dishes a must? The selection is slimmer, but there are some choices in plastics made specifically for the microwave. Look for dishes under the brand names Nordic Ware, Miracleware and ExtremeWare - and avoid products made from Melamine, Acrylic and Polystyrene.

Are you drawn to decorative or themed dishes? Trendy designs and seasonal themes are widely available in plastic tableware. Very decorative glasses are generally crafted in Acrylic, but be prepared to hand wash to keep them looking their best. You'll also find plenty of decorative and themed designs in durable easy-care Melamine dinnerware.

Is cost more important than longevity? Inexpensive seasonal Acrylic and Polystyrene tableware is plentiful on store shelves. But with plastics, you do get what you pay for. These low-cost styles won't hold up under impact or in the dishwasher for much more than a season or two.

Tip 3 - Know what you're buying - even if the label doesn't tell you:

You now know that the plastics used to make tableware vary indeed, and which type best meets your needs. So how do you tell if a plastic glass is made of SAN or Acrylic? How do you spot Melamine dishes? And what the heck is Polypropylene, anyway?

If shopping online with a reputable seller, product information will include plastic types, features and care. If it doesn't you may want to shop a different site as the seller may not know, or stand behind, their product. In-store shopping can be a bit trickier because not all plastic products are clearly labeled by type. There you'll need to know a bit more than the label tells you.

Unbreakable products in Tritan and Polycarbonate plastic are easy to identify because they're generally labeled as "Unbreakable" and "Dishwasher-safe" to offset their higher price tag. Tritan items are also labeled "BPA-free." Both plastics are generally found in glass-like clear or tinted drinkware and dishes.

Unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products in Polypropylene plastic are easy to identify, too. They're always opaque or semi-opaque, think Tupperware, and have a rubbery feel unlike any other plastic. These products also tend to be low-priced.

Labeling on Melamine dishes varies, but that's not a problem if you know what to look for. All melamine dishes are opaque - never see-through - and have a rigid feel. Because of melamine's durability and scratch-resistance, it's the most common plastic used to make dishes and can be found in a huge variety of colors and decorative designs. Melamine dishes are dishwasher-safe, but not microwave-safe, so melamine dishes are almost always marked "Not Intended for Microwave Use."

Plastic dishes and cookware made from microwave-safe plastics are always clearly labeled "Microwave-safe" because that's their major selling point. These items are always dishwasher-safe and sometimes oven-safe, too.

Glasses and dishes made from Acrylic, Polystyrene and SAN plastics are rarely labeled by type, but you can tell them apart. Though shatterproof, they're not truly unbreakable, so you won't see that on the label. The major difference is the care. SAN plastic products are dishwasher- and microwave reheat-safe, and usually labeled as such. Polystyrene products are generally labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," while Acrylic products are almost always "Hand Wash."

Tip 4 - Care matters! Enjoy your plastic tableware for years:

As plastics differ so does their care, but you can extend the life and looks of even the least expensive products if you treat them right.

In the dishwasher, a good rule of thumb for any plastic glasses - even those marked "Dishwasher-safe" - is to wash on a normal, unheated cycle. Some dishwashers heat water excessively in certain cycles, so a normal setting is always the best bet.

Items labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe" should be placed in the top rack, away from the heating element at the bottom - with one exception. Some Melamine dishes are labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," but they won't fit in the top rack. These are fine to wash in the bottom rack on an air-dry setting.

Items labeled "Hand Wash" really should be washed by hand. These products will quickly crackle or cloud if exposed to dishwasher heat and detergents.

Abrasive cleaners or scrubbers should not be used on any clear plastic glasses or plates as they will, without exception, scratch. Melamine plates hold up to most scrubber sponges.

Tip 5 - Ignore the #7 recycling symbol - it doesn't identify specific plastics:

Last, save yourself some shopping frustration. Don't rely on recycling numbers - those little numbers in a triangle on some plastic items - to identify plastics. In fact, these numbers don't even appear on many plastic tableware items. Why? It's simple, they're not disposable.

Recycling numbers, officially known as SPI codes, are intended to identify commonly disposed plastics so they can be efficiently recycled - that's all. The #7 code is a catchall number used for the non-recyclable plastics - and that includes many plastics used to make long-lasting tableware.

Contrary to some media stories, the #7 code does not denote an unsafe plastic. Anyone suggesting that all plastic items with the #7 code are unsafe because they contain the chemical BPA simply did not do their homework. Most good-quality plastics, including Melamine, Acrylic, SAN, Tritan and even biodegradable Eco-plastics all fall under the #7 code, and not one of them contains BPA.

Polycarbonate is the only tableware plastic that contains BPA. If media reports on BPA concern you, just avoid polycarbonate products. Products made from Tritan plastic offer the same benefits as polycarbonate, without BPA.

So whatever your tableware needs, from unbreakable plastic glasses for outdoors, to durable dishes for everyday, to decorative styles inspired by the season, there's surely a plastic available that meets your needs. Armed with these tips, you shouldn't have any problem finding it.

Sustason PSU

Polystyrene Sheets: It Has Many Uses

Anyone who is looking for added protection for a building will want to consider purchasing Plastic Roofing Sheets as these sheets can protect any roof from weather damage. They work well in both warm and cold climates and are very durable. Places where Plastic Roofing Sheets work best include sheds, garages, parking areas, and many other locations. It is easy to find suppliers of these materials as there are many companies online that offer them. Adding protection to a roof now can lead to big savings in the future.

Some of the many advantages of plastic roofing sheets include the lower cost, effective insulation of heat, and ease of installation. People have many different choices when it comes to the material they want to use on a roof. Their first choice may be metal, but this is a more expensive option. These are inexpensive and can be purchased in widths of three, four, and five feet. These sheets can also be custom cut to meet the needs of any roof. Insulation with this type of roof is great as the warm air is kept in during the cold winter months. Cooler air can be trapped inside during the summer. Plastic roofing sheets do not warm up too quickly or too slowly, so they are ideal for many building projects.

People who want to improve their home without the help of others will want to consider these Sheets. They are easy to install and can be cut with a heavy duty scissors or tooth saw. As long as someone knows the measurements of a plastic roofing sheet, they will be able to purchase a custom cut online. These sheets are light weight and easy to work with. Anyone will be able to install them on their own as opposed to having professionals install metal sheets.

The lower cost, effective insulation of heat, and ease of installation are just some of the many advantages of Plastic Roofing Sheets. Consumers will find these sheets to be aesthetically pleasing as they fit in well with the design of any home, garage, office, or other living space. Anyone who purchases them will be pleased they made the switch. Cold weather climates will enjoy watching the snow slide off these sheets when the sun shines on them. Now is a great time to purchase this type of material.

Eureka

What Plastic Materials Are UV Stable?


California Machine Grade Sheet Plastic

Eureka Plastic Rods

Many clients throughout the Eureka area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

Unitem PEI Sheet

Eureka Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

If you're shopping around for plastic tableware, you've no doubt seen that plastic glasses and dishes come in a vast array of styles, types and even qualities these days. Since each promises a different set of features and benefits, choosing the right plastic tableware may seem a daunting task. But don't despair! Here are a few tips to help you decide which type of plastic best meets your needs, and how to know exactly what you're buying.

Tip 1 - Don't just shop for "plastic," because not all plastics are created equal:

So true! Ever had indestructible plastic glasses that last from year to year, while others break the first time they're dropped? How about plastic dishes that scratch like crazy after a few uses? What about plastic plates that overheat after just seconds in the microwave -- or glasses that clouded in the dishwasher?

Though frustrating, these common issues aren't really defects in the plastic, they're just differences. More than a half-dozen types of plastic are used to make tableware - from unbreakable Tritan and budget-friendly SAN, to scratch-resistant Melamine and decorative Acrylic. Each offers its own benefits and drawbacks.

Knowing how different plastics perform and how to tell them apart when shopping can ensure that the plastic dishes, glasses and serving pieces you choose best meet your needs. Tips two and three will help you do just that.

Tip 2 - Decide on the features that matter to you before shopping:

Shopping for plastic tableware would be a cinch if a single plastic offered it all -unbreakable, scratchproof, dishwasher and microwave-safe. Unfortunately, that plastic is not yet invented. So of the plastics that do exist, which option is right for you?

Do unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products top your list? If so, spending a little more on unbreakable Tritan or Polycarbonate plastic items is well worth the years of use you'll enjoy. For a little less, SAN plastic products are almost as durable, and casual looks in Polypropylene are equally durable and very inexpensive. Avoid anything in Acrylic or Polystyrene.

Are scratched dishes your pet peeve? Then Melamine dishes are your best choice for long-term satisfaction. But you'll have to forego the convenience of microwave heating.

Are microwave-safe dishes a must? The selection is slimmer, but there are some choices in plastics made specifically for the microwave. Look for dishes under the brand names Nordic Ware, Miracleware and ExtremeWare - and avoid products made from Melamine, Acrylic and Polystyrene.

Are you drawn to decorative or themed dishes? Trendy designs and seasonal themes are widely available in plastic tableware. Very decorative glasses are generally crafted in Acrylic, but be prepared to hand wash to keep them looking their best. You'll also find plenty of decorative and themed designs in durable easy-care Melamine dinnerware.

Is cost more important than longevity? Inexpensive seasonal Acrylic and Polystyrene tableware is plentiful on store shelves. But with plastics, you do get what you pay for. These low-cost styles won't hold up under impact or in the dishwasher for much more than a season or two.

Tip 3 - Know what you're buying - even if the label doesn't tell you:

You now know that the plastics used to make tableware vary indeed, and which type best meets your needs. So how do you tell if a plastic glass is made of SAN or Acrylic? How do you spot Melamine dishes? And what the heck is Polypropylene, anyway?

If shopping online with a reputable seller, product information will include plastic types, features and care. If it doesn't you may want to shop a different site as the seller may not know, or stand behind, their product. In-store shopping can be a bit trickier because not all plastic products are clearly labeled by type. There you'll need to know a bit more than the label tells you.

Unbreakable products in Tritan and Polycarbonate plastic are easy to identify because they're generally labeled as "Unbreakable" and "Dishwasher-safe" to offset their higher price tag. Tritan items are also labeled "BPA-free." Both plastics are generally found in glass-like clear or tinted drinkware and dishes.

Unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products in Polypropylene plastic are easy to identify, too. They're always opaque or semi-opaque, think Tupperware, and have a rubbery feel unlike any other plastic. These products also tend to be low-priced.

Labeling on Melamine dishes varies, but that's not a problem if you know what to look for. All melamine dishes are opaque - never see-through - and have a rigid feel. Because of melamine's durability and scratch-resistance, it's the most common plastic used to make dishes and can be found in a huge variety of colors and decorative designs. Melamine dishes are dishwasher-safe, but not microwave-safe, so melamine dishes are almost always marked "Not Intended for Microwave Use."

Plastic dishes and cookware made from microwave-safe plastics are always clearly labeled "Microwave-safe" because that's their major selling point. These items are always dishwasher-safe and sometimes oven-safe, too.

Glasses and dishes made from Acrylic, Polystyrene and SAN plastics are rarely labeled by type, but you can tell them apart. Though shatterproof, they're not truly unbreakable, so you won't see that on the label. The major difference is the care. SAN plastic products are dishwasher- and microwave reheat-safe, and usually labeled as such. Polystyrene products are generally labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," while Acrylic products are almost always "Hand Wash."

Tip 4 - Care matters! Enjoy your plastic tableware for years:

As plastics differ so does their care, but you can extend the life and looks of even the least expensive products if you treat them right.

In the dishwasher, a good rule of thumb for any plastic glasses - even those marked "Dishwasher-safe" - is to wash on a normal, unheated cycle. Some dishwashers heat water excessively in certain cycles, so a normal setting is always the best bet.

Items labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe" should be placed in the top rack, away from the heating element at the bottom - with one exception. Some Melamine dishes are labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," but they won't fit in the top rack. These are fine to wash in the bottom rack on an air-dry setting.

Items labeled "Hand Wash" really should be washed by hand. These products will quickly crackle or cloud if exposed to dishwasher heat and detergents.

Abrasive cleaners or scrubbers should not be used on any clear plastic glasses or plates as they will, without exception, scratch. Melamine plates hold up to most scrubber sponges.

Tip 5 - Ignore the #7 recycling symbol - it doesn't identify specific plastics:

Last, save yourself some shopping frustration. Don't rely on recycling numbers - those little numbers in a triangle on some plastic items - to identify plastics. In fact, these numbers don't even appear on many plastic tableware items. Why? It's simple, they're not disposable.

Recycling numbers, officially known as SPI codes, are intended to identify commonly disposed plastics so they can be efficiently recycled - that's all. The #7 code is a catchall number used for the non-recyclable plastics - and that includes many plastics used to make long-lasting tableware.

Contrary to some media stories, the #7 code does not denote an unsafe plastic. Anyone suggesting that all plastic items with the #7 code are unsafe because they contain the chemical BPA simply did not do their homework. Most good-quality plastics, including Melamine, Acrylic, SAN, Tritan and even biodegradable Eco-plastics all fall under the #7 code, and not one of them contains BPA.

Polycarbonate is the only tableware plastic that contains BPA. If media reports on BPA concern you, just avoid polycarbonate products. Products made from Tritan plastic offer the same benefits as polycarbonate, without BPA.

So whatever your tableware needs, from unbreakable plastic glasses for outdoors, to durable dishes for everyday, to decorative styles inspired by the season, there's surely a plastic available that meets your needs. Armed with these tips, you shouldn't have any problem finding it.

Cast Nylon Sheet

Plastic Roofing Sheets: They Have Many Advantages

Some of our most popular questions are "Is this material UV stable?", or "How long will this last in direct sunlight?", or some similar themed question. These are great questions. Just look at the 'cheap' backyard furniture you bought last season, yep, it is faded and cracking or broken. Why is that?

The quick answer is the material had either no UV (Ultra Violet Light) stabilizer or very little - or it was simply the wrong plastic for the part. Most plastic materials are not UV stable to start with, other than Acrylic which is invisible to UV. All other materials need a little something (an additive) to give it the protection it may need from the sun. Many plastic materials, if given the proper UV resistant additives, can be used in direct sunlight for 10 - 15 years, or more, providing excellent performance in harsh environments.

The first factor in picking such a material is the intended use. Not all materials are good choices for all applications. While some materials will perform exceptionally well, others plastic materials under the same conditions will fail. Many plastic materials are not well suited to: high temperatures, chemical exposure, UV light, high impact, or electrical applications. Please contact us for details on a material that may meet your needs.

HDPE sheet is one of the best materials for long term outdoor use, if given the proper additives (without UV inhibitors it will fade and crack quickly). Next time you drive by a children's playground in your local city, look at the brightly colored panels used to make the play equipment. This is a HDPE sheet with heavy UV additives, and this makes an excellent application. Available in a rainbow of colors and able to be fabricated easily, this material is excellent for many outdoor applications.

If your application is more mechanical, other materials that might be used would be: Polycarbonate, UHMW, ABS (especially with Korad - Acrylic cover), Acetal, Noryl and many more.

Our standard Makrolon Polycarbonate is a UV stable material in sheet, and is frequently used in replacement glazing applications. The remaining materials on the list are available in Black (a carbon black pigment) which extends outdoor usage. While still not recommended for direct sunlight, they can be used with a good possibility of success - depending on design. Plastics can become brittle or lose properties over time if material does not have UV stabilization, with the proper material and the proper additives, you can get years of trouble free service.

Additionally, many materials will work well if they are painted to cover the plastic surface. Many spray paints, especially Acrylic paints, last many years in the sun. Please check with us, as some material do not accept paints or coatings.

Take some time to review your requirements, and the properties of the plastic you intend to use. The right material will provide the best performance. Contact any of our Plasticologists for assistance, call 866-832-9315 or email us. You can always do research on plastic materials at Industrial Plastic Supply.

Eureka

Plastic Roofing Sheets: They Have Many Advantages


Nevada Engineering Plastic Sheet