Wellington Plastic Strip

Many clients throughout the Wellington area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

Sanatec Cutting Board

Wellington Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

Plastics cover a broad field of organic synthetic resin and may be divided into two main classifications - aerospace thermoplastics _ and aerospace thermosetting plastics. Thermoplastics may be softened by heat and can be dissolved in various organic solvents.

Aerospace Thermoplastics.

Thermoplastics may be softened by heat and can be dissolved in various organic solvents. Two kinds of transparent thermoplastic materials are commonly employed in windows, canopies, etc. These are known as acrylic plastics and cellulose acetate plastics. Cellulose acetate was used in the past but since it is dimensionally unstable and turns yellow after it has been installed for a time, it has just about passed from the scene and is not considered an acceptable substitute for acrylic. Acrylic plastics are known by the trade names of Lucite or Plexiglas and by the British as Perspex and meet the military specifications of MIL-P-5425 for regular acrylic, MIL-P-8184 -~ 184 for craze-resistant acrylic.

Aerospace Thermosetting Plastics.

Thermosetting plastics do not soften appreciably under heat but may char and blister at temperatures of 240 to 260 'C (400 to 500 °F). Most of the moulded products of synthetic resin composition, such as phenolic, urea-formaldehyde, and melamine formaldehyde resins, belong to the thermosetting group. Once the plastic becomes hard, additional heat will not change it back into a liquid as it would with a thermoplastic.

Storage and handling.

Because transparent thermoplastic sheets soften and deform when they are heated, they must be where the temperature will never be excessive.

Aerospace thermoforming.

Transparent acrylic plastics get soft and pliable when they are heated to their forming temperatures and can be formed to almost any shape. When they cool, they retain the shape to which they were formed. Acrylic plastic may be cold-bent into a single curvature if the material is thin and the bending radius is at least 180 times the thickness of the sheet. Cold bending beyond these limits will impose so much stress on the surface of the plastic that tiny fissures or cracks, called crazing, will form.

Forming methods.

Simple Curve Forming. Heat the plastic material to the recommended temperature, remove it from the heat source, and carefully drape it over the prepared form. Carefully press the hot plastic to the form and either hold or clamp the sheet in place until it cools. This process may take from ten minutes to one-half hour. Do not force-cool it.

Compound-Curve Forming.

This type of forming is normally used for such parts as canopies or complex wingtip light covers, and it requires a great deal of specialized equipment. There are four commonly used methods, each having its advantages and disadvantages.

Stretch forming. Preheated acrylic sheets are stretched mechanically over the form in much the same way as is done with the simple curved piece. Special care must be taken to preserve uniform thickness of the material, since some parts will have to stretch more than others.

Male And Female Die Forming. This requires expensive matching male and female dies. The heated plastic sheet is placed between the dies which are then mated. When the plastic cools, the dies are opened.

Aerospace Vacuum Forming Without Forms. Many aircraft canopies are formed by this method. In this process a clamp with an opening of the desired shape is placed over a vacuum box and the heated sheet of plastic is clamped in place. When the air in the box is evacuated, the outside air pressure will force the hot plastic through the opening and form the concave canopy. It is the surface tension of the plastic that shapes the canopy.

Aerospace Vacuum Forming With A Female Form. If the shape needed is other than that which would be formed by surface tension, a female mould, or form must be used. It is placed below the plastic sheet and the vacuum pump is connected. When air from the form is evacuated, the outside air pressure will force the hot plastic sheet into the mould and fill it.

Hostaform Acetal

Plastics In Natural Disasters

Plastic corrugated or corrugated plastic as it is commonly referred, is one of the main products used in the reusable packaging industry. Sure, there are other items in this packaging sector such as molded totes or heavy gauge thermoformed plastic trays, but nothing says returnable packaging quite like plastic corrugated. Virtually anything that is made of paper corrugated can be duplicated using corrugated plastic. These items include plastic corrugated boxes, stackable totes, corrugated plastic partitions and dunnage, as well as material handling carts and racks using this resilient material as a main component.

The following tips regarding plastic corrugated will help you think like packaging professional the next time a reusable packaging application crosses your desk.

1. Try different styles of plastic corrugated containers before purchasing a production quantity to make sure you have all of the features your project needs. The best catalog descriptions in the world are no substitute for testing corrugated plastic in real situations.

2. Test different thicknesses of plastic corrugated with your particular application. Corrugated plastic is available in thicknesses ranging from 2mm to 13mm. You may be able to save money by using thinner material.

3. Check to see if your supplier has stock sheets of plastic corrugated from which they can produce your corrugated plastic containers. This will result in a quicker lead time.

4. Compare prices between using a stock sheet of plastic corrugated which is then die cut to your container size and having custom run corrugated plastic sheets for your project. Custom run plastic corrugated sheet sizes should be more efficient for your supplier to run which will result in a lower price per container.

5. Consider applying a printed label instead of direct printing or silk screening on plastic corrugated. Labels on plastic corrugated can look just as nice, will last longer, and cost less than silk screening on corrugated plastic.

6. Ask if a utility or recycled grade of corrugated plastic is available. Utility plastic corrugated is less expensive than virgin material.

7. Evaluate the cost of running a small production run of plastic corrugated (less than 100 pieces) using sample making equipment instead of purchasing a die. There could be a significant price difference.

8. Consider having plastic corrugated partitions and dunnage rod locked so they don't come apart. Corrugated plastic dividers made this way are more stable and last longer.

9. Test plastic corrugated against your product to make sure it doesn't scratch. Plastic corrugated is generally non-abrasive but there are some products that are susceptible to scratching. For these applications use plastic corrugated lined with a non-abrasive coating such as spunbond fabric or even cross link foam.

10. Consider corrugated plastic for internal dunnage that traditionally has been done using wood, steel, or aluminum. Recent advances in plastic corrugated technology allow it to be nailed, screwed, and bolted which results in reusable packaging that is incredibly strong yet lightweight.

In closing, these tips should help the novice as well as the seasoned veteran find alternatives to paper packaging while reducing their cost. In this day and age of pressure for cost reductions, plastic corrugated returnable packaging solutions can help any company improve their bottom line.

Wellington

Plastics In Natural Disasters


Nevada Engineering Plastic Sheet

Wellington Performance Plastic Rod

Many clients throughout the Wellington area have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don’t know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape performance plastic sheet materials into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming, is a process by which a plastic sheet or thin sheet of plastic, such as a PVC sheet, is heated up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children’s plastic toys, but that’s just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it’s often the vacuum process.

TFE Sheets

Wellington Best Plastic Sheet Supplier

Many have heard the term vacuum forming, but they do not know what it really means, and they don't know what it does or how it can help them in their business. Vacuum forming is a procedure that can shape plastic into many different forms, and it is one of the best ways to make a host of different plastic products.

How Does it Work?

A type of thermoforming, vacuum forming is a process by which a sheet of plastic, a PVC sheet, heats up so that it becomes malleable. The heating process includes the use of aluminum plates and infrared heaters. The heat application will come from the top and the bottom so that it is uniform and will provide the best results.

Once the heat finally reaches the proper temperature (which can differ based on the thickness of the sheets in use) the vacuum will mold the sheets to form the product. The vacuum is able to provide an airtight environment, which is going to be better for the overall molding process.

As the plastic cools, it is going to shrink slightly, and this is something that you will have to consider when you are setting up the process. Different types of vacuum formable plastic sheet are available, in different thicknesses, so it's important to understand how the different sheets work so you can get the product just right. You may also have to do some trimming to finished product. It can take some time to become proficient at the vacuum forming process, but the results are well worth it. It is also possible to find companies that will perform the process for you, which is a good idea for many.

Products from Vacuum Forming

With this type of thermoforming, one could create countless types of products, and you may find that your company could benefit greatly from the process. One of the most common products using vacuum forming today are children's plastic toys, but that's just one of the possibilities. Product packaging is another option, and it is one most companies that create, manufacture, package and sell products could use. Most of the plastic items that you see around the home and office have gone through some type of thermoforming, and it's often the vacuum process.

The Many Benefits of Vacuum Forming

One of the first benefits that you will notice when you start vacuum forming is that you will be able to make multiple products from the mold that you use. The speed at which you will be able to make your products is quite astounding as well. Once you have the molds set up and the proper training, making the products will proceed much more quickly. When you have a number of the same mold available, you will be able to increase your output exponentially.

Of course, vacuum forming is just one of the many different options available with thermoforming and making products from plastic. It's always a good idea to research all of the different options and then choose the one that most suits your business and the products that you are trying to create.

Norylux PPO Sheet

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Polycarbonate

If you're shopping around for plastic tableware, you've no doubt seen that plastic glasses and dishes come in a vast array of styles, types and even qualities these days. Since each promises a different set of features and benefits, choosing the right plastic tableware may seem a daunting task. But don't despair! Here are a few tips to help you decide which type of plastic best meets your needs, and how to know exactly what you're buying.

Tip 1 - Don't just shop for "plastic," because not all plastics are created equal:

So true! Ever had indestructible plastic glasses that last from year to year, while others break the first time they're dropped? How about plastic dishes that scratch like crazy after a few uses? What about plastic plates that overheat after just seconds in the microwave -- or glasses that clouded in the dishwasher?

Though frustrating, these common issues aren't really defects in the plastic, they're just differences. More than a half-dozen types of plastic are used to make tableware - from unbreakable Tritan and budget-friendly SAN, to scratch-resistant Melamine and decorative Acrylic. Each offers its own benefits and drawbacks.

Knowing how different plastics perform and how to tell them apart when shopping can ensure that the plastic dishes, glasses and serving pieces you choose best meet your needs. Tips two and three will help you do just that.

Tip 2 - Decide on the features that matter to you before shopping:

Shopping for plastic tableware would be a cinch if a single plastic offered it all -unbreakable, scratchproof, dishwasher and microwave-safe. Unfortunately, that plastic is not yet invented. So of the plastics that do exist, which option is right for you?

Do unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products top your list? If so, spending a little more on unbreakable Tritan or Polycarbonate plastic items is well worth the years of use you'll enjoy. For a little less, SAN plastic products are almost as durable, and casual looks in Polypropylene are equally durable and very inexpensive. Avoid anything in Acrylic or Polystyrene.

Are scratched dishes your pet peeve? Then Melamine dishes are your best choice for long-term satisfaction. But you'll have to forego the convenience of microwave heating.

Are microwave-safe dishes a must? The selection is slimmer, but there are some choices in plastics made specifically for the microwave. Look for dishes under the brand names Nordic Ware, Miracleware and ExtremeWare - and avoid products made from Melamine, Acrylic and Polystyrene.

Are you drawn to decorative or themed dishes? Trendy designs and seasonal themes are widely available in plastic tableware. Very decorative glasses are generally crafted in Acrylic, but be prepared to hand wash to keep them looking their best. You'll also find plenty of decorative and themed designs in durable easy-care Melamine dinnerware.

Is cost more important than longevity? Inexpensive seasonal Acrylic and Polystyrene tableware is plentiful on store shelves. But with plastics, you do get what you pay for. These low-cost styles won't hold up under impact or in the dishwasher for much more than a season or two.

Tip 3 - Know what you're buying - even if the label doesn't tell you:

You now know that the plastics used to make tableware vary indeed, and which type best meets your needs. So how do you tell if a plastic glass is made of SAN or Acrylic? How do you spot Melamine dishes? And what the heck is Polypropylene, anyway?

If shopping online with a reputable seller, product information will include plastic types, features and care. If it doesn't you may want to shop a different site as the seller may not know, or stand behind, their product. In-store shopping can be a bit trickier because not all plastic products are clearly labeled by type. There you'll need to know a bit more than the label tells you.

Unbreakable products in Tritan and Polycarbonate plastic are easy to identify because they're generally labeled as "Unbreakable" and "Dishwasher-safe" to offset their higher price tag. Tritan items are also labeled "BPA-free." Both plastics are generally found in glass-like clear or tinted drinkware and dishes.

Unbreakable, dishwasher-safe products in Polypropylene plastic are easy to identify, too. They're always opaque or semi-opaque, think Tupperware, and have a rubbery feel unlike any other plastic. These products also tend to be low-priced.

Labeling on Melamine dishes varies, but that's not a problem if you know what to look for. All melamine dishes are opaque - never see-through - and have a rigid feel. Because of melamine's durability and scratch-resistance, it's the most common plastic used to make dishes and can be found in a huge variety of colors and decorative designs. Melamine dishes are dishwasher-safe, but not microwave-safe, so melamine dishes are almost always marked "Not Intended for Microwave Use."

Plastic dishes and cookware made from microwave-safe plastics are always clearly labeled "Microwave-safe" because that's their major selling point. These items are always dishwasher-safe and sometimes oven-safe, too.

Glasses and dishes made from Acrylic, Polystyrene and SAN plastics are rarely labeled by type, but you can tell them apart. Though shatterproof, they're not truly unbreakable, so you won't see that on the label. The major difference is the care. SAN plastic products are dishwasher- and microwave reheat-safe, and usually labeled as such. Polystyrene products are generally labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," while Acrylic products are almost always "Hand Wash."

Tip 4 - Care matters! Enjoy your plastic tableware for years:

As plastics differ so does their care, but you can extend the life and looks of even the least expensive products if you treat them right.

In the dishwasher, a good rule of thumb for any plastic glasses - even those marked "Dishwasher-safe" - is to wash on a normal, unheated cycle. Some dishwashers heat water excessively in certain cycles, so a normal setting is always the best bet.

Items labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe" should be placed in the top rack, away from the heating element at the bottom - with one exception. Some Melamine dishes are labeled "Top Rack Dishwasher-safe," but they won't fit in the top rack. These are fine to wash in the bottom rack on an air-dry setting.

Items labeled "Hand Wash" really should be washed by hand. These products will quickly crackle or cloud if exposed to dishwasher heat and detergents.

Abrasive cleaners or scrubbers should not be used on any clear plastic glasses or plates as they will, without exception, scratch. Melamine plates hold up to most scrubber sponges.

Tip 5 - Ignore the #7 recycling symbol - it doesn't identify specific plastics:

Last, save yourself some shopping frustration. Don't rely on recycling numbers - those little numbers in a triangle on some plastic items - to identify plastics. In fact, these numbers don't even appear on many plastic tableware items. Why? It's simple, they're not disposable.

Recycling numbers, officially known as SPI codes, are intended to identify commonly disposed plastics so they can be efficiently recycled - that's all. The #7 code is a catchall number used for the non-recyclable plastics - and that includes many plastics used to make long-lasting tableware.

Contrary to some media stories, the #7 code does not denote an unsafe plastic. Anyone suggesting that all plastic items with the #7 code are unsafe because they contain the chemical BPA simply did not do their homework. Most good-quality plastics, including Melamine, Acrylic, SAN, Tritan and even biodegradable Eco-plastics all fall under the #7 code, and not one of them contains BPA.

Polycarbonate is the only tableware plastic that contains BPA. If media reports on BPA concern you, just avoid polycarbonate products. Products made from Tritan plastic offer the same benefits as polycarbonate, without BPA.

So whatever your tableware needs, from unbreakable plastic glasses for outdoors, to durable dishes for everyday, to decorative styles inspired by the season, there's surely a plastic available that meets your needs. Armed with these tips, you shouldn't have any problem finding it.

Wellington

Polystyrene Sheets: It Has Many Uses


Nevada Engineering Plastic Sheet